Gist of Freedom

”I had bought a pistol the first thing after Tom Moss was lynched, because I expected some cowardly retaliation from the lynchers. I felt that one had better die fighting against injustice than to die like a dog or a rat in a trap…

I felt if I could take one lyncher with me, this would even up the score a little bit!”

Ida never feared the lynch mob, she had faith in God to protect her: “Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil; For You are with me; Your rod and Your staff, they comfort me” (Psalms 23:4). A threat to her life was not going to stop her from her crusade.

“The Review of Reviews announced that Wells, “a talented and resolute young lady of colour”, was on a pilgrimage around the British Isles to campaign on the subject of Negro lynching; they also published these Sadistic Statistics, “in 1893, excluding Sundays, a Coloured man was lynched every day from January to December.”

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Ida B. Wells: Warrior for Justice presented by Safiya Bandele!

England ~”The Daily Chronicle ran a column on “the young coloured lady who is conducting in England such a plucky campaign for the rescue of her people from the brutalities of the Southern States of America.At the beginning of June, “The Review of Reviews announced that Wells, “a talented and resolute young lady of colour”, was on a pilgrimage around the British Isles to gain ‘pity’ from its inhabitants on the subject of Negro lynching. The paper republished a table of statistics that had originally appeared in the Chicago Tribune, illustrating the number of black people that had been lynched in 1893. The Review calculated that in 1893, “excluding Sundays, a coloured man was lynched every day from January to December, and two out of three of the victims were not even accused of assaulting white women.” The condemnation continued, with a final statement: – when “ruffians take to skinning men alive, vivisecting them, and burning them slowly to death, no decent man can resent the expression of horror and indignation that burst from the lips of all observers.” By the end of May, Wells had made her way to London. She stayed for six weeks, during which time she moved among the city’s religious, liberal and intellectual elite. She spoke at 35 meetings.

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